Y10 – 27/01/17

Due: 01/02 (Issued: 27/01)

Title: Paper 1 Question 4

Task: Focus this part of your answer on the second half of the source, from line 18 to the end.

A student, having read this section of the text said: “The writer brings the very different characters to life for the reader. It is as if you are inside the coach with them.

To what extent do you agree?

In your response, you could:

  • write about your own impressions of the characters
  • evaluate how the writer has created these impressions
  • support your opinions with quotations from the text.

Musts

  • This is a 20 mark question. Respond accordingly

Extract

The few passengers huddled together for warmth, exclaiming in unison when the coach sank into a heavier rut than usual, and one old fellow, who had kept up a constant complaint ever since he had joined the coach at Truro, rose from his seat in a fury; and, fumbling with the window-sash, let the window down with a crash, bringing a shower of rain upon himself and his fellow-passengers. He thrust his head out and shouted up to the driver, cursing him in a high petulant voice for a rogue and a murderer; that they would all be dead before they reached Bodmin if he persisted in driving at breakneck speed; they had no breath left in their bodies as it was, and he for one would never travel by coach again.

Whether the driver heard him or not was uncertain: it seemed more likely that the stream of reproaches was carried away in the wind, for the old fellow, after waiting a moment, put up the window again, having thoroughly chilled the interior of the coach, and, settling himself once more in his corner, wrapped his blanket about his knees and muttered in his beard.

His nearest neighbour, a jovial, red-faced woman in a blue cloak, sighed heavily, in sympathy, and, with a wink to anyone who might be looking and a jerk of her head towards the old man, she remarked for at least the twentieth time that it was the dirtiest night she ever remembered, and she had known some; that it was proper old weather and no mistaking it for summer this time; and, burrowing into the depths of a large basket, she brought out a great hunk of cake and plunged into it with strong white teeth.

Mary Yellan sat in the opposite corner, where the trickle of rain oozed through the crack in the roof. Sometimes a cold drip of moisture fell upon her shoulder, which she brushed away with impatient fingers.

She sat with her chin cupped in her hands, her eyes fixed on the window splashed with mud and rain, hoping with a sort of desperate interest that some ray of light would break the heavy blanket of sky, and but a momentary trace of that lost blue heaven that had mantled Helford yesterday shine for an instant as a forerunner of fortune.

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Y9 – 26/01/17

Due: 01/02 (Issued: 26/01)

Title: Figurative Devices Revision

Task: You have been issued a double-sided revision sheet on Figurative Devices. This:

  • Names an important figurative device
  • Provides a definition
  • Gives examples of potential effect on the reader

You must revise from this sheet, quizzing and requizzing yourself in your exercise book so that you are able to:

  1. identify a device in a text
  2. provide potential effects on the reader

Explanation: Figurative devices are used by writers for a specific effect, attempting to engage the reader, draw their attention to an important idea, reflect the theme or simply to create a vivid image in the reader’s mind.

Understanding the effect of these devices is the key to developing a deep response to texts.

Revision Document: figurative-devices-revision.docx

Y10 – 24/01/17

Due: 27/01 (Issued: 24/01)

Title: Contrasting Analysis

Task: Write two PEA paragraphs discussing how the language changes your understanding of the poem.

You are the sun
in reverse, all energy
flows into you . . .

Musts

  • Two full PEA paragraphs
  • First paragraph to discuss how the poem starts out, seeming to be positive
  • Second paragraph must discuss how the poem alters our perception from positive to negative
  • Second paragraph must include an analysis of the last line “flows into you”
  • After you have written both paragraphs, get a parent to help you correct any mistakes in SPaG (spelling, punctuation and grammar)

Paragraph 1

P) In Atwood’s Unnamed poem the first line leads the reader to assume that the poem is positive.

E) Atwood writes “You are the sun” to an unnamed subject, addressed as “you” through direct address.

I) Atwood compares the subject to a “____” using a…

W) Atwood is suggesting that… because…

R) The reader imagines/thinks/feels… because…

L) However, this idea of a positive comparison is upset as the poem continues.

Paragraph 2

P) Atwood is in fact comparing the subject as/to…

E) Atwood writes “…”.

I) The _____ “_____” means/refers to…

W) Atwood is actually suggesting… because…

R) The reader imagines/thinks/feels… because…

Y8 – 20/01/17

Due: 25/01 (Issued: 20/01)

Title: A Blessing of a Rewrite

Task: How does the poet use language and structure to present how important water is to the people in this community?

Musts

  • 2 full PEA paragraphs of analysis on the “importance of water to this community”
  • Writer inference
  • Reader reaction

Poem

The skin cracks like a pod.
There is never enough water.

Imagine the drip of it,
the small splash, echo
in a tin mug,
the voice of a kindly god.

Sometimes, the sudden rush
of fortune. The municipal pipe bursts,
silver crashes to the ground
and the flow has found
a roar of tongues. From the huts,
a congregation: every man woman
child for streets around
butts in, with pots,
brass, copper, aluminium,
plastic buckets,
frantic hands,

and naked children
screaming in the liquid sun,
their highlights polished to perfection,
flashing light,
as the blessing sings
over their small bones.

Sentence Starters

P) The poet describes the water’s importance to this community through/by…

E) One example of this may be found in the line “…”

I) The noun/verb/adjective/adverb (phrase) “_____” means/refers to…

W) The writer is inferring/suggesting/signifying… because…

R) The reader imagines/thinks/feels… because…

L) This is further supported by / revealed through… / developed by…

Y9 – 20/01/17

Due: 24/01 (Issued: 20/01)

Title: Phoenix Analysis

Task: How does the poet use language and structure to present the speaker’s views on the Pakistani style clothing that her aunts from Pakistan have sent to her in the UK?

Musts

  • Analyse the section below
  • Write at least 3/4 of a page
  • PEA paragraphing structure
  • Infer what the writer means
  • React to your inference

Extension

  • Utilise quotations from anywhere else in the poem as supporting evidence in the Writer or Reader sections.
  • Self-edit: SPaG

   My costume clung to me
and I was aflame,
I couldn’t rise up out of its fire,
half-English,
unlike Aunt Jamila.

 

Y7 – 19/01/17

Due: 24/01 (Issued: 18/01)

Title: Creative Writing

Task: Write two PEA paragraphs discussing how the language changes your understanding of the poem.

You are the sun
in reverse, all energy
flows into you . . .

Musts

  • Two full PEA paragraphs
  • First paragraph to discuss how the poem starts out, seeming to be positive
  • Second paragraph must discuss how the poem alters our perception from positive to negative
  • Second paragraph must include an analysis of the last line “flows into you”
  • After you have written both paragraphs, get a parent to help you correct any mistakes in SPaG (spelling, punctuation and grammar)

Paragraph 1

P) In Atwood’s Unnamed poem the first line leads the reader to assume that the poem is positive.

E) Atwood writes “You are the sun” to an unnamed subject, addressed as “you” through direct address.

I) Atwood compares the subject to a “____” using a…

W) Atwood is suggesting that… because…

R) The reader imagines/thinks/feels… because…

L) However, this idea of a positive comparison is upset as the poem continues.

Paragraph 2

P) Atwood is in fact comparing the subject as/to…

E) Atwood writes “…”.

I) The _____ “_____” means/refers to…

W) Atwood is actually suggesting… because…

R) The reader imagines/thinks/feels… because…

Y10 – 18/01/17

Due: 24/01 (Issued: 18/01)

Title: Creative Writing

Task: Imagine the rock singer, PJ Harvey (Google her), up on stage. Place her in a scene showing her coming onto stage and her conflict between external attitude and internal doubt, because she knows… (a) her partner has just dumped her, or (b) this is her last performance before early retirement.

  • Make use of figurative techniques
  • Bring the scene to life, engaging with the description
  • Show external attitude through action and behaviour
  • Show internal attitude through external actions and behaviours as well as internal thoughts

Must:

  • Write at least half a page
  • Edit yourself: highlighting ineffective words, poor phrasing and locations where figurative devices can be used to emphasise imagery and engage action and description together

Mr Howse’s Example – Swansong

A single v-sign to the huddle and she departs, tearing herself away from the tears and toasting arms to the stairs that lead her – one last time – to the stage. They’ve chanted their last prayers together and now, as she collects up the Gibson Firebird and slings it over her head, elbowing it beneath her arm like a lance, she thumbs the strings for luck and exhales one long, outward breath.

Their dark twang is as nothing beneath the tumultuous din from across the horizon which halts her ascent.

In that moment she thinks of turning to the faces at her back but the throaty strum of the lead guitar from across stage begins to make its call and she instinctively draws herself up to full height and casts away the concerns that seem set to make her cry.

A roar goes up.

She palms the sheen of tears from her eyes, flicks back the curls in the flock of her raven tresses and struts onto the stage. She kicks forward in her calf-length boots with a shouldered swagger that takes the lead over the rhythm of the – now – guitars. And beneath their grungy chime the medals and paraphernalia that litter her vest and pants, jingle and jangle to the beat. Before her, upon the sea of the crowd she spies a number of arms raising high as if erupting from the swaying surf and she twitches one cheek into a wry smile.

Throwing up one hand upon the microphone she sets her chin against its head, shuts out the endless waves, draws forward the Firebird and feels herself begin to rise with her first lyric.

“He’s seen me,” she calls, rolling herself from the mic, “so clearly.”

One step. Two step. Her feet sashay a simple salsa that swings her to and fro. “Come over.”

She’s got this.