Y10 – 28/02/17

Due: 08/03 (Set: 28/02)

Title: Manderley

Task: Read the extract and answer Paper 1 Questions 1 (4 marks) and 2 (8 marks)

Extract – Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier (Chapter One)

Last night I dreamed I went to Manderley again. It seemed to me that I was passing through the iron gates that led to the driveway. The drive was just a narrow track now, its stony surface covered with grass and weeds. Sometimes, when I thought I had lost it, it would appear again, beneath a fallen tree or beyond a muddy pool formed by the winter rains. The trees had thrown out new low branches which stretched across my way. I came to the house suddenly, and stood there with my heart beating fast and tears filling my eyes.

There was Manderley, our Manderley, secret and silent as it had always been, the grey stone shining in the moonlight of my dream. Time could not spoil the beauty of those walls, nor of the place itself, as it lay like a jewel in the hollow of a hand. The grass sloped down towards the sea, which was a sheet of silver lying calm under the moon, like a lake undisturbed by wind or storm. I turned again to the house, and I saw that the garden had run wild, just as the woods had done. Weeds were everywhere. But moonlight can play strange tricks with the imagination, even with a dreamer’[s imagination. As I stood there, I could swear that the house was not an empty shell, but lived and breathed as it had lived before. Light came from the windows, the curtains blew softly in the night air, and there, in the library, the door stood half open as we had left it, with my handkerchief on the table beside the bowl of autumn flowers.

Then a cloud came over the moon, like a dark hand across a face. The memories left me. I looked again at an empty shell, with no whisper of the past about its staring walls. Our fear and suffering were gone now. When I thought about Manderley in my waking hours I would not be bitter; I would think of it as it might have been, if I could have lived there without fear. I would remember the rose garden in summer, and the birds that sang there; tea under the trees, and the sound of the sea coming up to us from the shore below. I would think of the flowers blown from the bushes, and the Happy Valley. These things could never lose their freshness.

Paper 1 Question 1

Read the first paragraph of the extract (above)
List four things from this part of the text that describes the grounds of Manderley

[4 marks]

Paper 1 Question 2

Look in detail at the second paragraph of the extract (above).
How does the writer use language here to describe the house?
You could include the writer’s choice of:

  • Words and phrases
  • Language features and techniques
  • Sentence forms

[8 marks]

 
Answer this question using the guidance here: https://howsework.wordpress.com/how-to-plan-and-write-analysis/

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Y7 – 23/02/17

Due: 02/03 (Issued: 23/02)

Title: Hamelin, A Rewrite

Task: Rewrite your short story about Hamelin

Write from the (1st person) p.o.v. of an aged parent who lost a child to the piper (how do you feel?)

  1. Refer to life 10 years after the children left
  2. Refer to life before the rats
  3. Refer to life with the rats
  4. Refer to the day after the children left

Musts

Your writing must include all the features of narrative covered in today’s lesson:

  1. Descriptions (Descriptive language to create images in the reader’s mind and enhance the story.)
    a) Physical descriptions (what characters look like)
    b) Setting descriptions (where characters are)
  2. Characterisation (Descriptive language to reveal personalities and identities)
    a)Behaviour descriptions
  3. Dialogue
    a) Speech (what characters say)
  4. Reflection
    a) Thoughts (what characters think)
    b) Experience (what characters know)

Extension

Bring your writing to life through the use of figurative devices (covered over the last few terms)

Y8 & 9 – 20/02/17

Due: 27/02 (Issued: 20/02)

Title: Persuasive Device Revision

Task: You have been issued a double-sided revision sheet on Persuasive Devices which:

  • Names an important rhetorical device
  • Provides a definition
  • Gives examples of potential effect on the reader

You must revise from this sheet, quizzing and requizzing yourself in your exercise book so that you are able to:

  1. identify a device in a text
  2. provide potential effects on the reader

Y10 – 10/02/17

Due: 22/02 (Issued: 10/02)

Title: Persuasive Letter

Task: Write the first draft of your persuasive letter

5) Students should be allowed to watch DVDs in lessons on the last day of term.
Write a letter to your head teacher arguing for or against this statement

[40 marks]

Musts

  1. Write your letter to Mr Barton
  2. Utilise a clear introduction
  3. Write 5 arguments
  4. Include 1 counter argument that you debunk (counter-counter argument)
  5. Write a conclusion that summarises your ideas
  6. Write at least 6 clear and strongly argued paragraphs
  7. Each paragraph must:
    establish a particular argument
    develop justifications
    develop from the previous paragraph (so that you cannot simply swap the paragraphs around) – make use of discourse markers

Arguments (For)

  1. After stressful exams – students deserve a break (wellbeing)
  2. Rewards benefit students’ interest and self esteem
  3. Cultural capital – develops understanding of outside world
  4. Expands cultural capital – history, literary, ethical, moral views and opinions
  5. Can be educational
  6. Some people benefit from visual learning over reading
  7. 1 day in 100 doesn’t matter
  8. Day before halfterm – students not engaged anyway

Arguments (Against)

  1. Parents may not want children watching (lack of benefit)
  2. Not everyone will engage with it (messing around)
    [Nova has binary behaviour – solves the problem through isolation]
  3. Watch films in your own time
  4. Some films have no value beyond entertainment
    [have a policy in place to choose films of benefit; they learn things without knowing it – osmosis]
  5. Pick up bad mannerisms
    [they will actually learn that’s the wrong thing – associate bad manners and the such like with villains and won’t identify with this behaviour]
  6. Films won’t get you a job in life and the purpose of school is preparation for a career [can build confidence (for interviews, etc), by giving access; jobs in the film industry are supported by an understanding of aspects of film; film industry is a burgeoning industry in Britain]
  7. Parents may deem some films inappropriate
    [controlled environment, sanctioned by age restrictions; not watched alone; similarly why hide from more difficult content and themes – in school we can discuss these ideas – cultural capital]Students who spend their time in isolation also benefit (is this fair)
    [They will want to be present to enjoy the rewards, so will eschew their bad behaviour; could be visual learners and might settle in this environment]

Y7 – 09/02/17

Due: 10/09 (Issued: 09/02)

Title: The Interrogative Sentence

Task: Complete the analysis of the sentence types to answer the question How does the writer use sentence types to interest the reader?

Write up your answers, as per the previous tasks:

Interrogative – [define its use and how its being used in the context]

Evidence: “What did you gather from this allusion to a band—a speckled band?”

[pick out the keyword / phrase and define the features and importance]

WHY? [Why has the writer written this?]

HOW? Feel. Imagine. Think [How does it affect the reader?]

Y9 – 09/02/17

Due: 20/02 (Issued: 09/02)

Title: Isolation

Task: Answer the three questions

  1. List four things you learn about Candy in this extract
  2. How does the writer use language to present Candy as isolated?
  3. Identify three quotations which suggest the theme of loneliness. Rank them in order of effectiveness. Then analyse your most effective quotation

Musts

  • Show planning (see approach, below)
  • Clear use paragraphs
  • Each paragraph analyses the text as a PEAIDWRL paragraph
  • Clear reference to subject terminology
  • Clear understanding on the effect on the reader

Approach

  1. Read the extract and comprehend what is being said
  2. WHAT: Read and understand the question
  3. WHERE: Identify EVIDENCE (a number of quotations)
  4. Evaluate and rank each quotation – how well does it answer the question (thoughts and feelings on difference)?
  5. Pick the 4/5 most effective quotations which help to answer the question
  6. WHICH: For each quotation: determine whether it’s positive or negative
  7. For each quotation: IDENTIFY the keyword / phrase
  8. For each quotation: DEFINE the word class / language device
  9. WHY: Determine why the WRITER has used this language
  10. For each quotation: explore connotations (associated feelings, rather than synonyms)
  11. For each quotation: evaluate the connotations for their effectiveness in answering the question
  12. HOW: Determine how this language affects the READER
  13. SO: What, then, is your POINT
  14. From your notes, write your PEAIDWRL paragraph
  15. Read, edit and correct your SPaG

Extract

Candy rolled to the edge of his bunk. He reached over and patted the ancient dog, and he apologized, “I been around him so much I never notice how he stinks.”

“Well, I can’t stand him in here,” said Carlson. “That stink hangs around even after he’s gone.” He walked over with his heavy-legged stride and looked down at the dog. “Got no teeth,” he said. “He’s all stiff with rheumatism. He ain’t no good to you, Candy. An’ he ain’t no good to himself. Why’n’t you shoot him, Candy?”

The old man squirmed uncomfortably. “Well- hell! I had him so long. Had him since he was a pup. I herded sheep with him.” He said proudly, “You wouldn’t think it to look at him now, but he was the best damn sheep dog I ever seen.”

George said, “I seen a guy in Weed that had an Airedale could herd sheep. Learned it from the other dogs.” Carlson was not to be put off. “Look, Candy. This ol’ dog jus’ suffers hisself all the time. If you was to take him out and shoot him right in the back of the head-” he leaned over and pointed, “-right there, why he’d never know what hit him.”

Candy looked about unhappily. “No,” he said softly. “No, I couldn’t do that. I had ‘im too long.”

“He don’t have no fun,” Carlson insisted. “And he stinks to beat hell. Tell you what. I’ll shoot him for you. Then it won’t be you that does it.”

Candy threw his legs off his bunk. He scratched the white stubble whiskers on his cheek nervously. “I’m so used to him,” he said softly. “I had him from a pup.”

“Well, you ain’t bein’ kind to him keepin’ him alive,” said Carlson. “Look, Slim’s bitch got a litter right now. I bet Slim would give you one of them pups to raise up, wouldn’t you, Slim?”

The skinner had been studying the old dog with his calm eyes. “Yeah,” he said. “You can have a pup if you want to.” He seemed to shake himself free for speech. “Carl’s right, Candy. That dog ain’t no good to himself. I wisht somebody’d shoot me if I get old an’ a cripple.”

Candy looked helplessly at him, for Slim’s opinions were law. “Maybe it’d hurt him,” he suggested. “I don’t mind takin’ care of him.”

Carlson said, “The way I’d shoot him, he wouldn’t feel nothing. I’d put the gun right there.” He pointed with his toe. “Right back of the head. He wouldn’t even quiver.”

Candy looked for help from face to face. It was quite dark outside by now.

Y10 – 10/02/17

Due: 22/02 (Issued: 10/02)

Title: Expression of Difference

Task: How does Sui Sin Far use language to describe her thoughts and feelings about being different from those around her? 

Musts

  • Show planning (see approach, below)
  • 4-5 clear paragraphs
  • Each paragraph analyses the text as a PEAIDWRL paragraph
  • Clear reference to subject terminology
  • Clear understanding on the effect on the reader

Approach

  1. Read the extract and comprehend what is being said
  2. WHAT: Read and understand the question
  3. WHERE: Identify EVIDENCE (a number of quotations)
  4. Evaluate and rank each quotation – how well does it answer the question (thoughts and feelings on difference)?
  5. Pick the 4/5 most effective quotations which help to answer the question
  6. WHICH: For each quotation: determine whether it’s positive or negative
  7. For each quotation: IDENTIFY the keyword / phrase
  8. For each quotation: DEFINE the word class / language device
  9. WHY: Determine why the WRITER has used this language
  10. For each quotation: explore connotations (associated feelings, rather than synonyms)
  11. For each quotation: evaluate the connotations for their effectiveness in answering the question
  12. HOW: Determine how this language affects the READER
  13. SO: What, then, is your POINT
  14. From your notes, write your PEAIDWRL paragraph
  15. Read, edit and correct your SPaG

Background

In 1890, Sui Sin Far wrote her autobiography in which she describes her experience of growing up in England and Canada, the child of a Chinese mother and English father and the racism she encountered.

Extract

When I look back over the years I see myself, a little child of scarcely four years of age, walking in front of my nurse, in a green English lane, and listening to her tell another of her kind that my mother is Chinese. “Oh Lord!” exclaims the informed. She turns around and scans me curiously from head to foot. Then the two women whisper together. Tho the word “Chinese” conveys very little meaning to my mind, I feel that they are talking about my father and mother and my heart swells with indignation. When we reach home I rush to my mother and try to tell her what I have heard. I am a young child. I fail to make myself intelligible. My mother does not understand, and when the nurse declares to her, “Little Miss Sui is a story-teller,” my mother slaps me.

Many a long year has past over my head since that day—the day on which I first learned I was something different and apart from other children, but tho my mother has forgotten it, I have not.

I see myself again, a few years older. I am playing with another child in a garden. A girl passes by outside the gate. “Mamie,” she cries to my companion. “I wouldn’t speak to Sui if I were you. Her mamma is Chinese.”

“I don’t care,” answers the little one beside me. And then to me, “Even if your mamma is Chinese, I like you better than I like Annie.”

“But I don’t like you,” I answer, turning my back on her. It is my first conscious lie.

***

I am only ten years old. And all the while the question of nationality perplexes my little brain. Why are we what we are? I and my brothers and sisters. Why did God make us to be hooted and stared at? Papa is English, mamma is Chinese. Why couldn’t we have been either one thing or the other? Why is my mother’s race despised? I look into the faces of my father and mother. Is she not every bit as dear and good as he? Why? Why? She sings us the song she learned at her English school. She tells us tales of China. Tho a child when she left her native land she remembers it well, and I am never tired of listening to the story of how she was stolen from her home. She tells us over and over again of her meeting with my father in Shanghai and the romance of their marriage. Why? Why?

I do not confide in my father and mother. They would not understand. How could they? He is English, she is Chinese. I am different to both of them—a stranger, tho their own child. “What are we?” I ask my brother. “It doesn’t matter, sissy,” he responds. But it does. I love poetry, particularly heroic pieces. I also love fairy tales. Stories of everyday life do not appeal to me. I dream dreams of being great and noble; my sisters and brothers also. I glory in the idea of dying at the stake and a great genie arising from the flames and declaring to those who have scorned us: “Behold, how great and glorious and noble are the Chinese people!”

Reaching Level 4

Shows detailed and perceptive understanding of language

  • Analyses the effects of the writer’s choices of language
  • Selects a judicious range of quotations
  • Uses a range of subject terminology appropriately