• Read the text / extract a few times
    • Become familiar with the who, what, why and how of it
  • Determine word meanings
    • What words don’t you know?
    • What word classes are they?
    • Can you look at the words around them to get their meaning?
  • Examine the structure
    • How is it presenting its information?
    • How is it developing its ideas / narrative?
  • Acquire a feel for the rhythm
    • How is punctuation being used?
    • What sentence types are being used?
    • How do these affect the pace, the detail and the complexity?
  • Examine the syntax 
    • What is the word order like?
    • How might this be important?
    • How is this effective?
  • Identify textual context
    • Who wrote it?
    • When was it written?
    • Why was it written?
  • Examine the tone and narrative voice
    • Perspective and tense
    • Atmosphere and mood
  • Visualize the image (what is the effect of any figurative language)
    • What is being described?
    • How does this come alive on the page and in your mind?
    • What are the keywords in the description?
    • SOAPMAPS (Simile, Onomatopoeia, Adjective, Personification, Metaphor, Adverb, Pathetic Fallacy, Senses)
  • Identify irony
    • Is the author / narrator being straightforward?
    • Or, do they mean the opposite of what they say?
    • Is it deliberately shocking?
    • Why might that be?
  • Notice rhetorical devices (what / how is it trying to persuade you?)
    • FAIRER APOSTLE (Fact, Alliteration, Imperatives, Rhetorical Questions, Exaggeration, Repetition, Anecdotes, Personal Pronouns, Opinions, Statistics, Triples, Emotive Language)
  • Determine the theme
    • What is it about?
    • What single word would you use to summarise it?
    • What is not being said?
  • Construct a thesis
    • Come up with your own thoughts or theory

 

Content of this page adapted from: literacyacrossdisciplines.cmswiki.wikispaces.net

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