Plan your clear and concise answer

AIDRWL structure

Capture

Capture
Argument

  • Think
    • Consider the question you are responding to…
      • is it a statement (in which case, do you agree or disagree)?
      • are you arguing a point (what is your point)?
      • are you highlighting specific language or a technique (what is it)?
      • what have you learnt from the text?
      • what is your argument?
  • Write
    • Write your argument in a single, concise sentence
      • clearly answer the question
      • identify your position (point of view / agreement or disagreement)
      • identify the specific language technique (if applicable)
      • unless creating an introductory paragraph, ensure this sentence expresses just one idea

Identify

  • Think
    • Consider the question you are responding to..
      • what quote / phrase / word from the text / extract supports your argument?
      • think about how it supports your argument (does it?)
      • what specific words support your argument? (zoom into the text)
      • choose the most important part of the quote to write as your second sentence
  • Write
    • Write your identified quote in a single, concise sentence
      • try to keep your quote below 10 words
      • introduce the quote properly
      • use the correct format of open ” and closing “
      • write the quote down verbatim

Define

  • Think
    • Consider the question you are responding to..
      • clearly direct your reader to specific words in your identified quote
      • what is the most important part of your identified quote?
      • which words specifically support your argument?
      • what synonyms can you use to define the meaning?
  • Write
    • Write your definition in (at least) a single, concise sentence
      • always express an idea in words that do not yet exist on your page
      • switch words you’ve found in the quote and used in your argument for synonyms (do not repeat words in your identified quote or from your argument)
      • do not repeat what you’ve already said in your argument (develop your answer – can you put your argument sentence here and create a better argument sentence?)

Reader

  • Think
    • Consider the question you are responding to…
      • what does your defined meaning, your understanding of your identified quote, make you think / feel?
      • why do you think / feel this?
      • what is the impact of the word(s) on you / the reader?
  • Write
    • Write your reader response in (at least) a single, concise sentence
      • ensure this part of your response still reflects on your argument, your identified quote, and how you’ve defined that quote – do not talk about something else, yet.

Writer

  • Think
    • Consider the question you are responding to…
      • why might the writer want you / the reader to think / feel like this?
      • why do you think the writer has made this particular choice?
      • why has the writer chosen the word(s)?
      • infer your deeper understanding of what the writer is showing / suggesting about the theme / setting / atmosphere / character / perspective / (social or historical) context (what were expectations like at this time?)
  • Write
    • Write your writer’s intention in (at least) a single, concise sentence
      • as above
      • ensure this part of your response still reflects on your argument, your identified quote, and how you’ve defined that quote – do not talk about something else, yet.

Link / Conclusion

  • Think
    • Consider the question you are responding to…
      • do you have more to say?
        • can you link this argument to a second point?
        • can you link this argument to a second quote?
        • can you link this argument to a wider contextual idea?
        • can you link this argument to your further understanding of the text?
      • have you reached the end?
        • summarise your main idea or your description of what you think about the writer’s attempt at presenting the text / theme / character, etc… in this way
  • Write
    • Write your reader response in (at least) a single, concise sentence
      • use a linking phrase to start a new paragraph or a concluding sentence to wrap up your answer.
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